medical technology

Clinical Laboratory Cookie Collection





As mentioned in a prior post, when my long-time supervisor retired last year
from her 44-year long career as a clinical laboratory scientist/supervisor,
I couldn't miss the chance to make her a bunch of clinical laboratory-related cookies.

The photo below depicts a view we see under the microscope of normal peripheral blood cells.
/www.cookiecrazie.com//2015/01/red-blood-cell-cookies-tutorial.html


The gray cookie in the photo below (bottom right) is an outline of the microscope we use in the lab.
The tubes in the photo are depicting purple-top tubes
we use to collect blood for a Complete Blood Count (CBC).


The photo below shows three different white blood cells on top of red blood cells.
(L to R) Eosinophil, Segmented Neutrophil, and Basophil.






Clinical Laboratory Cookie Collection


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Red Blood Cell Cookies (Tutorial)




I know it may seen a bit odd to be making red blood cell cookies.
But since I am a Clinical Laboratory Scientist.....and I work with blood in the laboratory.....
it makes sense that eventually red blood cell cookies would appear in the CookieCrazie kitchen.

The occasion came last year when my long-time supervisor was retiring.
She is a hematologist-at-heart, and absolutely loves helping discern what is under the microscope
to better facilitate the medical staff in diagnosing a patient.
I couldn't miss the chance to surprise her at her retirement party with lots of cookies
related to her monumental 44-year career at our health center!

Making red blood cell (RBC) cookies is fairly simple.
You just need some circle cookies and some bright red 10-second glaze.

To create the concave-disc-look of RBCs, make a thick outer ring on the circle cookie.

After it has dried for at least 30 minutes, outline and flood the entire circle with red glaze.
The original thick ring will cause the flood icing to sink in the center just like an RBC.



The other cell cookies are white blood cells.
In the photo below, (L to R), there is an Eosinophil, a Segmented Neutrophil, and a Basophil.
This is my world.....welcome to it. :)






Clinical Laboratory Cookie Collection





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